Tuesday, June 5, 2007

Looks like a Sugar Coated Stuff


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A newborn opossum


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What in the World Are You Doing?

This week I want to talk with you about leaving an impact legacy. "What is an impact legacy?" you may ask. It is how you impact people and the world around you. You see, many people glide through life and do not make much of an impact. That is unfortunate. Others though, those driven by a purpose and passion for living, are continually making the world a better place and making an impact wherever they go. That's what I believe you want to do.

In order to help you reflect on this during this week, I want to ask you a question: What in the world are you doing?

Here is the typical life - typical, though not everybody does it this way. But for the most part, people's lives generally go something like this:

You're born
You eat and sleep
You play with toys
You go to school
You play little league
You go to school
You learn to drive
You go to school
You leave high school
You go to more school, but you pay for it now
You get a job
You get married
You buy a house
You have kids
You watch your kids eat, sleep, play and go to school
You work, work, and work
You retire
You die

That's the basic life, isn't it? I know there is more to it, but that is about it for most people.

Here is that question again: What in the world are you doing?

I mean, what are you doing besides the typical "enjoying yourself while you are waiting to die" scenario? What kind of impact are you making?

What I believe sets the successful apart is that they don't just live the average life. They don't just pass time. They make an impact. They have something compelling in their life that drives them - something that gives them an answer when they are asked that question: What in the world are you doing?

I'm helping children.

I'm creating a business that supports many families.

I lead a church.

I am defending our liberties.

I am raising great children.

I'm teaching others to improve their lives.

I help people have fun.

I create memories for people.

In other words, successful people always come down to this:

I make an impact and help other people by (fill in your purpose here).


What in the world are you doing?

If you want to be successful, you need to be able to answer that by describing how you help others. Because if you aren't helping others - if you aren't making an impact - you are just taking up space, eating food and waiting to die.

Here's the question for you to answer this week and what to do with your answer:

What in the world are you doing?

If you know, then you are good to go - live it and make an impact!

If you don't know, then maybe you need to reflect on what you are doing, what your life is about, and how you can explode the mundane bubble you may be living in!

The world needs impact makers - so live to be one!

7 Bizarre Things to Do After You’re Dead

Some of us just can't let go. Even after we've assumed room temperature. If this sounds like you, call up your lawyer and have him sharpen his quill. Put one of these burial rituals into your last request, and keep the conversation interesting at the wake.
  1. Have your body stuffed like artist Jeremy Bentham. As requested in his will, his body was preserved and stored in a wooden cabinet, termed his "Auto-Icon". Originally kept by his disciple Dr. Southwood Smith, it was acquired by University College London in 1850. The Auto-Icon is kept on public display at the end of the South Cloisters in the main building of the College. The Auto-Icon has always had a wax head, as Bentham's head was badly damaged in the preservation process. The real head was displayed in the same case for many years, but became the target of repeated student pranks including being stolen on more than one occasion. It is now locked away securely. (Side note: you may have to truly befriend a taxidermist whilst you're still alive to make this first one happen. It's not really a "walk-in" sort of job.)
  2. Launch yourself into space at Space Services, Inc. You can, "touch the cosmos… Space Services makes it possible to honor the dream and memory of your departed loved one by launching a symbolic portion of cremated remains into Earth orbit, onto the lunar surface or into deep space." $495 gets you into low Earth orbit. A cool $13k can get a bit of you-flavored cool-aid mix shot into the heart of our galaxy.
  3. Make yourself into the hardest thing on the planet with Life Gem. I always wanted to be really shiny, and now, when I die, I can be. Life gem extracts pure carbon from your remains and forges a diamond. Man of steel my foot, I'd rather be the most sought after rarest most well-marketed gem on the planet.
  4. You and your body could always "go green". You might be turning that shade after a few days anyway, but now it can be good thing for the environment. Maybe you've got concerns about the effects on the environment of traditional burial or cremation. You can choose to be buried in a coffin made of cardboard or other easily-biodegradable materials. Furthermore, you could choose to have your final resting place in a park or woodland, known as an eco-cemetery, and you can have a tree planted over your grave as a contribution to the environment and a remembrance. Get more info at ForestofMemories.org
  5. You could go online. Everyone's doing it these days. You don't even have to have a pulse, just a modem. A quick visit to Online-Funeral.com (I couldn't make this up if I wanted to) and you're on your way to stiff cyberspace. Just make sure your will clearly spells out the difference between a Night Elf Hunter's garb and a Night Elf Druid's garb for your embalmer. Everyone knows druids are pussies and you wouldn't want to look silly on the big day.
  6. Have someone eat your sins , if you've got six-pence. (I would imagine, this is handy solution for those without religion, but insecure in their lack of belief.) This was common practice in the 19th century in Wales. A sin eater was hired to place a cube of salt on the dead body and then place a loaf of bread on top of that. The eater would mutter an incantation and then consume the bread with a bowl of beer or milk. It was then understood that he had taken all the deceased sins upon himself. Sin eaters were generally despised in their communities and considered Pariah: irredeemable souls. (And underpaid ones, if you ask me.) references
  7. Maybe you're not going quietly into that good night at all. Perhaps you would be best served by U.S. patent #81,437, the coffin escape hatch. ""The nature of this invention consists in placing on the lid of the coffin, and directly over the face of the body laid therein, a square tube, which extends from the coffin up through and over the surface of the grave, said tube containing a ladder and a cord, one end of said cord being placed in the hand of the person laid in the coffin, and the other end of said cord being attached to a bell on the top of the square tube, so that, should a person be interred ere life is extinct, he can, on recovery to consciousness, ascend from the grave and the coffin by the ladder; or, if not able to ascend by said ladder, ring the bell, thereby giving an alarm, and thus save himself from premature burial and death" [pic] I would imagine this was much more useful back then when medicine was a more horrifying less precise science.

Concept Audi TT

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Proof of global warming

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Charming Images of India


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The Taj Mahal rises on the shore of the Yamuna River. Though the waterway faithfully reflects the building's beauty, it has become one of the most polluted rivers in India.

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A New Delhi snake charmer and his cobra enact an ancient ritual that has become less common on India's streets. Wildlife protection laws and more modern entertainments have put many charmers out of business.

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Pilgrims bathe in the sacred waters of Kadil Dhara waterfall, at the headwaters of the Narmada River. Hindus revere the river and consider it second only to the Ganges in significance.

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Pilgrims file past a reflecting pool to visit the legendary Taj Mahal. This "poem in stone," was created by the 17th-century Mogul ruler Shah Jehan in memory of his favorite wife.

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The view from Rajasthan's Kumbhalgarh Fort tempts a langur monkey to linger on the walls and enjoy a moment of leisure.

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Evening crowds pack the streets adjoining Mumbai's Minara Mosque, at the center of the city's largest Muslim quarter.
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One of Orissa's most famous temples, Lingaraja Temple, draws both pilgrims and tourists to Bhubaneshwar. The Shiva shrine was built around 1000 A.D.

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Happy Indian girls display hands decorated by the art of henna. The temporary tattoos are made from vegetable-based dyes.

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Ganges River ghats are sacred ground to many Hindus, who descend their steps to bathe in "Mother Ganga's" cleansing waters.

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The rising sun warms a train of domesticated elephants headed for a bath. Keepers cleanse the animals in the Gandak River at Sonpur, India.

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The fruits of Kashmiri agriculture are on display in Srinagar. Vendors jostle on the waters of Dal Lake in hopes of a prime spot.

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Nandi the bull enjoys a drink of curried milk, provided by a priest at Brihadishwara temple. Nandi is the mount of the mighty Hindi god Shiva.

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Traffic of the two- and three-wheeled variety dominates a Delhi street.

Budapest at Night

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Sociable

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